Brie Larson Comedies and Music Career 2001 to 2008

Larson's first major role came as Emily, the younger daughter of Bob Saget's character, in the WB sitcom Raising Dad, which aired for one season during the 2001–02 television schedule. Hal Boedeker of Orlando Sentinel criticized the program and wrote that its cast members were "merrily joking through the show". She was next hired for the ABC sitcom Hope & Faith, but she and some other cast members were replaced after an unaired pilot.  In 2003, she starred alongside Beverley Mitchell in the Disney Channel movie Right on Track, based on the junior drag race star sisters Erica and Courtney Enders, and played minor roles in the 2004 comedies Sleepover and 13 Going on 30.

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Larson developed an interest in music at age 11 when she learned to play the guitar. A music executive encouraged her to write her own songs, and she began self-recording and uploading tracks to her own website. After failing to get cast as Wendy Darling in the 2003 film Peter Pan, a heartbroken Larson penned and recorded a song named "Invisible Girl", which received airplay on KIIS-FM. She soon signed a recording deal with Tommy Mottola of Casablanca Records; she and Lindsay Lohan were the only artists signed by the label at that time. In 2005, she released the album Finally Out of P.E., in which she also co-wrote songs with other songwriters, including Blair Daly,

Pam Sheyne, Lindy Robbins, and Holly Brook. She named it after a gym teacher she disliked and has said that the songs she wrote were mostly about failed job opportunities. One of her singles, "She Said", was featured in the MTV series Total Request Live, was listed by Billboard in their weekly listings of the most-played videos in the channel, and peaked at number 31 on the Billboard Hot Single Sales. Larson went on tour with Jesse McCartney for Teen People's "Rock in Shop" mall concerts, opened for him during his Beautiful Soul tour, and also performed in New York City at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade.

Even so, the album was not a success, selling only 3,500 copies. Larson later admitted to being disillusioned with her music career, saying, "I wanted to write all my own songs, and [the recording company] were afraid of that. I wanted to wear sneakers and play my guitar—they wanted heels and wind blown hair."


In 2006, Larson was cast alongside Logan Lerman and Cody Linley in the comedy film Hoot, about young vigilantes trying to save a group of owls. It received poor reviews, but Ruthe Stein of San Francisco Chronicle was appreciative of Larson and Linley for bringing "a dash of Indiana Jones to their roles".

She had a small part, the following year, in the Amber Heard-starring drama Remember the Daze, and she launched an arts and literature magazine, named Bunnies and Traps, for which she wrote her own opinion columns and accepted submissions from other artists and writers. Larson has said that she frequently considered giving up acting at that time, as she found it difficult to find much work, blaming it on filmmakers' inability to typecast her. She was particularly discouraged when she lost out on key roles in the films Thirteen (2003) and Juno (2007). To support herself, Larson worked as a club DJ.

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